Kasperhof

Römerstraße 13

6082

Patsch, Austria

Architect

architektur:lokal - DI Dr. Gertrud Tauber, Arch.DI Andreas Semler
Römerstraße 13, A - 6082 Patsch
info@architektur-lokal.at
+43 (0)512 371400

User

architektur:lokal e.G.
A‑6082 Patsch, Römerstr. 13
info@architektur-lokal.at
+43 (0) 512 371 400

Contact Details

DI Alexander Rieser
Universität Innsbruck
alexander.rieser@uibk.ac.at
+43 512 507-63601

Other Information

© Silbersalz
The revitalisation of the village centre and its versatile use, with an area of about 650 m2, has been realised by the refurbishment of a former farm, the Kasperhof in Patsch, which had been vacant for more than 20 years.
Energy performance
33,07 kWh/m2.y

Climate Zone Dfb

Altitude 1013 m a.s.l.

HDD 4657

CDD 13

Protection level Not listed

Conservation Area:
Yes

Level of Protection:
Ortsbildschutz

Building age 1600-1700

Year of last renovation:
2019

Building use Residential (rural)

Secondary use:
Offices

Building occupancy:
Permanently occupied

Building area Net floor area [m²]: 650,0

Building typology:
Tenement (apartments)

Number of floors:
5

Basement yes/no:
Yes

Number of heated floors:
4

Gross floor area [m²]:
1123,0

Thermal envelope area [m²]:
459,93

Volume [m³]:
1765,86

NFA calculation method:
ArchiPhysik - gross floor area

Construction type
Stone masonry wall

External finish:
Plaster facade, wooden facade on the upper floors

Internal finish:
Plastered (on hard)

Roof type:
Pitched roof

+ MORE - LESS
© Silbersalz
© Silbersalz
east view, © Silbersalz
east view, © Silbersalz
north facade, © Silbersalz
north facade, © Silbersalz
south facade, © Silbersalz
south facade, © Silbersalz
© Silbersalz
© Silbersalz
corridor ground floor, © Silbersalz
corridor ground floor, © Silbersalz
kitchen, © Silbersalz
kitchen, © Silbersalz
former stable, now it is used as a seminar room, © Silbersalz
SEE MORE +
former stable, now it is used as a seminar room, © Silbersalz
office, © Silbersalz
office, © Silbersalz
stairway, © Silbersalz
stairway, © Silbersalz
exposed stone masonry, © Silbersalz
exposed stone masonry, © Silbersalz
roof terrace, © Silbersalz
roof terrace, © Silbersalz
© Silbersalz
© Silbersalz
former smoke chamber, today it is uses as a bath, © Silbersalz
former smoke chamber, today it is uses as a bath, © Silbersalz
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
© architektur:lokal e.G.
old view from the building, © architektur:lokal e.G.
old view from the building, © architektur:lokal e.G.
old barn floor, © architektur:lokal e.G.
old barn floor, © architektur:lokal e.G.

RENOVATION PROCESS

Architecture

BUILDING DESCRIPTION

In the pre-industrial era, the Kasperhof in Patsch provided the necessary space for the living quarters of the peasant family and for the essential living resources, the agriculture. The living quarters were directly connected to the stables and the barn was located above these two areas. This provided natural insulation in winter due to the relatively loose hay supplies which found their place directly above the rooms. Only the "Stube" with the tiled stove and the kitchen with a wood stove for cooking were heated. The last 20 years before the refurbishment the Kasperhof was not inhapited.
Urban context
Nowadays, the Kasperhof in Patsch scores points with its close location to the city of Innsbruck. The city is easily accessible by public transport, a bus stop is located directly in front of the Kasperhof and can be reached quickly by car via the direct motorway connection. Due to its convenient location, Patsch was already in pre-Roman times an important stopover for traders and merchants on the salt road. Today the south-facing hillside location accommodates about 1000 inhabitants and offers with the nature reserve Rosengarten enough space for recreation for humans and animals.

HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE

ELEMENTS WORTHY OF PRESERVATION
During the renovation of the building special attention was paid to maintaining the original appearance of the building. The building substance with the strong stone walls was integrated into the design concept. The window design was based on the existing building, therefore box-type windows were used again for the most parts. The post and beam construction with the decorative gable was also completely preserved and was only equipped with some single windows in order to be able of using the threshing floor as living space. Only the roof structure was completely rebuilt on the existing rafters, whereby the roof was covered with hand-beaten concrete roof tiles in order to retain mostly of the original appearance. Historical details were integrated into the concept wherever possible and skilfully staged.
Heritage Value Assesment
Due to the fact that the yard was subject to the protection of the townscape, for the owner the renovation was too expensive and time-consuming. Thereupon he decided to sell the farm, which proved to be difficult. For this reason, Architektur:lokal developed an assembly project. After the approval, new owners were found for the four different units and the design was further developed. The renovation brought new life to the empty building, even though the type of use changed considerably.

State of repair

Conditions of the envelope
Although the Kasperhof had been uninhabited and unused for about 20 years, the massive stone walls could be used as an existing basic building block without having to carry out expensive underpinning work. The roof truss itself still fulfilled its function and only needed to be reinforced from a structural point of view. The roof skin was at least still tight and protected the rest of the building over the years.
Description of pre-intervention building services
There was drinking water and sewage in the building. The existing house had one toilet and bathroom with bathtub per floor. Furthermore, the building had an existing electrical distribution system in the living rooms.

Aim of retrofit

Renovation
The main goal of the renovation was to preserve the Kasperhof. A vacancy study by architektur:lokal revealed that in the Wipptal (southern valley from Innsbruck to the Brenner Pass) more than 200 buildings were vacant. Due to the increasing number of the average usable floor space of apartments (2017: 101 m²!), these old buildings have to be used in order to avoid the constant demand for new building land and to prevent the soil from sealing. Historical buildings represent another special value due to their material resources built in the area. In most cases this is 100% ecological. For this reason, special emphasis was placed on the use of ecological materials during the renovation. In order to create a harmonious overall picture, the materials have been incorporated into the existing building and are reflected in the old, re-laid floorboards, the box-type windows imitating the existing stock and the hand-beaten concrete roof tiles. However, due to the conversion of the building some measures (lighting, insulation of the roof) were necessary, which changed the visual appearance with regard to the proportions of the roof and the window openings.
Was there any change of use?
In the 20 years before the refurbishment the whole building was vacant, in the time before the refurbishment it was used as a farmhouse with stables, although most of the time they sheltered cows, pigs and hens. Today it serves as a residential and office building.
Stakeholders Involvement
Architect
architektur:lokal - DI Dr. Gertrud Tauber, Arch.DI Andreas Semler
Römerstraße 13, A - 6082 Patsch
info@architektur-lokal.at
Tel.+43 (0)512 371400
Structural Engineer
Wibmer & Aigner ZT GmbH
Johann-Federer-Straße 2, A - 6300 Wörgl
office@wa–ingenieure.at
Tel.+43 (0)5332 73920
Other
DI Andreas Danler
Moos 10, A - 6082 Patsch
di.danler@ikbnet.at
Tel.+43 (0) 664 137 87 57
Tools used
Was the renovation process done following a specific methodology? No
Energy calculation Archi Physik 13.0.72

RETROFIT SOLUTIONS

External Walls

stone masonry

stone masonry

During the renovation, an attempt was made to preserve the existing façade. A large part of the 90 cm (i.m.) thick stone masonry on the ground floor of the existing house was not insulated but lime plastered in the traditional way. Only the window reveals were insulated with calcium silicate panels. The 70 cm thick stone walls in lime mortar were insulated, depending on their orientation, with 10 to 12 cm mineral foam panels and a mineral interior plaster. Particular importance was attached to maintaining a diffusion open overall system.

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K]: 2,14 W/m²K U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K]: 0,34 W/m²K
More Details
Original wall build-up
Plaster - limeplaster:
50 mm
Stone - limestone masonry:
700 mm
Plaster - limeplaster:
30 mm
Plaster - limeplaster:
30 mm
Retrofitted wall build-up
Plaster - limeplaster:
50mm
Stone - limestone masonry:
700 mm
Insulation - mineral foam boards incl. glue:
120 mm
Plaster - limeplaster:
30 mm

In the attics, the former function of the barn has been preserved due to the preservation of the roof truss, the decorative gable and the sunburned scarfboards remained legible. The new, insulated external wall was installed facing to the inside. A solid wood post and mullion construction has been assembled and blown out with cellulose. After the installation of an internal vapour barrier, 4 cm thick clay building board was applied and plastered with a 1 cm thick clay plaster.

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K]: 2,97 W/m²K U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K]: 0,156 W/m²K
More Details
Original wall build-up
Cladding - wooden cladding:
20 mm
Retrofitted wall build-up
Cladding - wooden cladding:
20mm
Wood panelling - AGEPAN THD STD 190:
16 mm
Insulation - post and mullion construction with cellulose:
200 mm
Wood panelling - OSB - Platte:
18 mm
Other - vapour barrier (Hygrodiode 20 classic):
0 mm
Other - clay builiding plate:
40 mm
Plaster - clay plaster:
10 mm


Windows

box-type window

box-type window

The existing box-type windows were in desolate condition. In order to preserve the original appearance of the façade, the old box-type windows were replaced by new box-type windows. The windows were painted similar to the existing ones. All new windows were made of local larch. All units were equipped with generous 4-part lift and slide elements as access to a private outdoor area (balcony/terrace). All windows were equipped with heat insulation glass (Ug 0.6 W/m2K).

Thanks to the detailed reproduction of the box-type windows, there is hardly any change in the appearance of the façade. The new openings and windows represent an intervention in the historical appearance. By using wooden windows, the new windows were integrated into the wooden facade in the best possible way and guarantee generous lighting of the living space.

Existing window U-value Glass [W/m2K]: 5,8 New window U-value Glass[W/m2K]: 0,9 Existing window U-value Frame [W/m2K]: 1,4 New window U-value Frame [W/m2K]: 1,4
More Details
Existing window type Box-type window
Existing glazing type Single
Existing shading type NA
Approximate installation year 1900
New window type Box-type window
New glazing type Triple
New shading type NA
New window solar factor g [-] 0,63

Other interventions

ROOF

GROUND FLOOR

ROOF

The roof truss was preserved and was upgraded according to static requirements. Above the visible existing rafters a rafter-mounted insulation with wood fibre insulation was implemented. The roof was covered with hand-beaten concrete roof tiles. Large roof windows were installed.

The existing cold roof truss had to be upgraded for the use of the attic as living space. The old rafters were retained as exposed rafters. However, the new construction changed the thickness of the roof, which is hardly visible from the outside. The integration of skylights and loggias resulted in a change in the appearance. However, care was taken to preserve certain details such as the decorative gable and to cover the roofing with materials appropriate to the time.

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K] 2,97 U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K] 0,175
More Details
Original roof build-up
Other - Fibre cement corrugated sheet:
10 mm
Other - wooden boards:
20 mm
Other - rafters:
140 mm
Retrofitted roof build-up
Tiles - hand-beaten concrete roof tiles:
30 mm
Other - Roof lathing / counter lathing:
80 mm
Bitumen - Sarnafil TU 222:
0 mm
Other - wooden paneling:
20 mm
Other - wood fibre insulation (GUTEX Thermosafe-homogen):
240 mm
Other - vabour barrier (Hgrodiode 20 classic):
0 mm
Other - Gisps board (building board + fire protection board):
25 mm
GROUND FLOOR

The largest part of the ground floor was built directly above ground level and has no basement.The new floor was installed floating and set off from the walls (gap). The gap to the floor structure serves to remove any rising damp as quickly as possible via the strip foundations and stone walls. On the outside of the outer wall, half-sided concrete blocks were placed against the existing wall to ensure ventilation and thus drying out of the wall. In combination with lime plaster and a sump lime paint, the moisture can be quickly removed. After excavation of the existing floor structure, 15 cm of foam glass gravel was laid. A foil and a granular subbase (5 cm) were applied over this insulating levelling layer. Subsequently, a bituminous waterproofing layer with an overlying fill layer (3.5 cm) and another classic floor construction with a footfall sound insulation layer (3 cm), PE-foil and heated screed were installed. The former plank floors were planed off at the bottom and glued to the new screed.

By reusing the original wooden planks from the upper floors, the appearance of the existing floors was changed but adapted to suit the building.

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K] 2,50 U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K] 0,24
More Details
Original groundfloor build-up
Other - soil:
10 mm
Other - air gap:
100 mm
Other - wood planks:
40 mm
Retrofitted groundfloor build-up
Insulation - foam glass gravel:
150 mm
Other - granular subbase + bituminous waterproofing :
50 mm
Other - overlying fill layer:
35 mm
Insulation - footfall sound isolation:
30 mm
Other - PE-foil:
1 mm
Concrete slab - heated sreed:
60 mm
Other - wood planks:
30 mm

HVAC

HEATING

DOMESTIC HOT WATER

HEATING

Only gas floor heating was used for the building's heating system. The distribution in the ground floor and in the two attics is done by floor heating, in the first floor by radiators. Solar panels were not permitted by the town and village council. A heating system such as pellets or wood chips was not possible due to the lack of space (no correspondingly large cellar with storage facilities available). A district heating connection does not exist in the community of Patsch.

More Details
New primary heating system
New system type Boiler
Fuel Gas
Distribuition system Radiating floor
Nominal power 36,91 kW
DOMESTIC HOT WATER

The domestic hot water is heated with the gas heating system and stored in a boiler.

More Details
New DHW system
Type with heating system
Hot_water_tank Yes
With heat recovery No

Energy Efficiency

Energy Performance
Energy performance certificate: by means of archiPHYSIK
Voluntary certificates: No
Energy Use
Heating
Primary Energy 107,61 kWh/m2.y
Documents:
Kasperhof_EA_1612e.pdf
energy certification, © BM DI Danler

Consumption_estimation_After: 33,07 kWh/m2.y

Primary Energy
Consumption_estimation_Calculation_method: NA
Consumption_estimation_Including_DHW: No
Consumption_estimation_After: 107,61 kWh/m2.y

Costs

Financial Aspects

The refurbishment was also successful from a financial point of view. By developing the project in advance and presenting it directly to the interested parties, with whom the project was finally implemented, the ancillary purchase costs could be reduced. Thus the costs for an apartment with 180 m² were about 450,000 € gross. This results in a gross price of 2500 € per m² living space, which is even less than the value for a normal new building.

Investment Costs
Total investment costs
2500 € (per m2)
Running Costs
Lifecycle cost
No

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