Oberbergerhof

Montagna - Montan, Italia

architetto

Dr. Arch. David Stuflesser
Petlinstraße/Via Petlin 18, I-39046 St.Ulrich, Ortisei
T+F 0039 0471 786517

Contact Details

Alexandra Troi
Eurac Research - HS Coburg
alexandra.troi@hs-coburg.de

Other Information

Related publications
https://atlas.arch.bz.it/de/oberbergerhof/
Exterior view (© Rene Riller)
The Oberbergerhof is located in the idyllic community of Montan. This was first mentioned in the 14th century and carefully renovated in 2016. The project won 1st place in the Bauern(h)auszeichnung and thus the ITAS Prize 2017 for the best renovation of a farmhouse in South Tyrol.
Energy performance
135 kWh/m2.y

Climate Zone Cfb

Altitude 497 s.l.m.

HDD 3113

CDD 0

Protection level Listed

Conservation Area:
No

Level of Protection:
denkmalgeschützt

Building age before 1600

Year of last renovation:
2016

Year of previous renovation:
0

Building use Residential (rural)

Secondary use:
During the harvest season, the attic serves as accommodation for up to two workers.

Building occupancy:
Permanently occupied

Number of occupants/users:
5

Building area Net floor area [m²]: 140,0

Building typology:
Detached house

Number of floors:
2

Basement yes/no:
Si

Number of heated floors:
2

NFA calculation method:
Useful area (it)

Construction type
Stone masonry wall

External finish:
Rendered

Internal finish:
Plastered (on hard)

Roof type:
Pitched roof

+ MORE - LESS
Exterior view (© Rene Riller)
Exterior view (© Rene Riller)
New entrance for young farmer's family (© Rene Riller)
New entrance for young farmer's family (© Rene Riller)
© Rene Riller
© Rene Riller
© Rene Riller
© Rene Riller
© Werner
© Werner
© Werner
© Werner
© Werner
© Werner
Northeast view (© Stuflesser)
Northeast view (© Stuflesser)
Southeast view (© Stuflesser)
Southeast view (© Stuflesser)
Southwest view (© Stuflesser)
Southwest view (© Stuflesser)
Northwest view (© Stuflesser)
Northwest view (© Stuflesser)
Historical photography (© Oberberger)
Historical photography (© Oberberger)
Vaulted entrance (© René Riller)
Vaulted entrance (© René Riller)
Section East-West before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Section East-West before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Groundfloor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Groundfloor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
First flor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
First flor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Second floor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Second floor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Attic floor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Attic floor plan before renovation (© Stuflesser)
Exterior view before renovation (© Oberberger)
Exterior view before renovation (© Oberberger)

RENOVATION PROCESS

Architecture

BUILDING DESCRIPTION

The Oberbergerhof is located in the idyllic community of Montan, in the southern part of South Tyrol (Italy), about 15 km of Bolzano. The building was first mentioned in the 14th century and was considered one of the wealthiest farms in the village in the 16th and 17th centuries. The manor, built in a mixed construction, has been changed over the centuries and is now a listed building. It is believed that it also formed part of the castle ensemble. The renovation was carried out with local materials. New elements made of steel have been cleverly integrated into the historical ambience. Thanks to the favorable location, one could avoid insulating the historical stone walls. The young farmer's modern apartment has been modernized. The old servants' rooms in the attic are an asset to the farmhouse. Historical structures and spatial units have been preserved. The cross ridge vault in the corridor of the apartment on the second floor is particularly striking, and was restored with great attention to detail, like the entire property. The project received the 1st prize at the Bauern(h)auszeichnung - ITAS Prize 2017 for the best renovation of a farmhouse in South Tyrol.

HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE

ELEMENTS WORTHY OF PRESERVATION
The historical structures and spatial units, the beautiful doors, the striking wooden floorboards and the large central hall with double arched (bifora) windows from the late Renaissance were preserved. The impressive cross vault on the second floor of the farmhouse was particularly worth preserving.
Heritage Value Assesment
All the materials used in the construction of the Oberbergerhof were sourced locally. The farm is a typical example of the wineries in the Southtyrolean Unterland with vaulted corridors and a central hall with double arched (bifora) windows.
Heritage Assessment Files

State of repair

Conditions of the envelope
From 1500 to 1637 the farm developed into typical winery of the South Tyrolean "Unterland" with charming cellar rooms, two floors with attractive vaulted corridors and a large central hall. In the 17th century the building was further extended.

Aim of retrofit

Renovation + Extension
The renovation of the Oberbergerhof should accommodate the home of the younger farmer and his family, as well as providing accommodation for the harvest workers. First of all, it was necessary to create a separate entrance for the young family, so that every generation could keep a certain degree of privacy in the shared apartment building. The external shape of the farm should not change significantly in order to do respect the monument. The few skylights were set in a targeted manner and the facade kept its typical character, the traditional appearance was thus preserved. On the other hand, a contemporary design was chosen for the interior of the building. This was implemented following a house-in-house approach. The roof is left uninsulated, an instead a thermal box is built inside. Modern living between the historic walls is thus successfully achieved. Rooms natural illumination is ensured thanks to well-placed roof windows whose location was decided together with the Heritage Authority. It was also important for all those involved in the construction to restore the historic cross vault.
Was there any change of use?
The building served as a home for the Oberberger family both before and after the renovation. The changes in use are therefore limited to the distribution of space inside. The young farmer's family lived in another building before the renovation and changed the floor plan or the rooms on the second floor as far as possible. Also, the newly created access to the separate units should be mentioned. The top floor, on the other hand, was converted from an attic into temporary accommodation for harvest workers. In the appartment of the senior farmer still only kitchen and bath room are heated.
Lessons learned
Since the farmhouse is located in a climatically favorable and sunny location, it was deliberately decided not to insulate the exterior walls, which are coated with beautiful, historic plaster, both inside and out. The energy balance was improved solely by renewing the insulation of the intermediate floors, the new windows and the wood-burning stove. This has resulted in an improvement of 40% (calculated - since the apartment was not previously used or heated in its entirety)
Stakeholders Involvement
Architect
Dr. Arch. David Stuflesser
Petlinstraße/Via Petlin 18, I-39046 St.Ulrich, Ortisei
Tel.T+F 0039 0471 786517
Tools used
Was the renovation process done following a specific methodology? No

RETROFIT SOLUTIONS

External Walls

Stone masonry with lime plaster

House-in-House

Stone masonry with lime plaster

Since the farmhouse is located in a climatically favorable and sunny location, it was deliberately decided not to insulate the exterior walls, which are coated with beautiful, historic plaster, both inside and out. The users do guarantee a sufficiently dry indoor air with careful natural ventilation and avoid this the mould risk, which the relatively cold surfaces especially in corners would otherwise cause.

The U-value given is better than it would result purely mathematically from the thermal conductivity value of the natural stone and takes into account the mortar components and air inclusions. It was not measured on site, but is based on values from the literature and was indirectly verified with the consumption values.

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K]: 1,7 W/m²K U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K]: 1,7 W/m²K
More Details
Original wall build-up
Plaster - Kalkputz:
20 mm
Stone - Naturstein aus der Region :
500 mm
Plaster - Kalkputz:
20 mm
Retrofitted wall build-up
Plaster - Kalkputz :
20mm
Stone - Naturstein aus der Region :
500 mm
Plaster - Kalkputz:
20 mm
House-in-House

In the attic, that was not renovated as such, an additional residential unit was installed for the harvest workers. 55m ² divided into living room, two bedrooms and bathroom,. The external walls were built as drywall with 16cm soft wood fiber board - two thirds are "inner walls" (towards the attic), one third real outer walls .

In purely mathematical terms, the unit has an "efficiency of the building envelope" according to the Klimahaus of 37 kWh / m² - in fact, the unit is only used from May until the end of November.

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K]: 0,0 W/m²K U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K]: 0,2 W/m²K
More Details
Original wall build-up
Other - Kein Bestandswand:
0 mm
Other - Kein Bestandswand:
0 mm
Retrofitted wall build-up
Wood - vertikale Bretterschalung Fichte mit Nut und Feder:
20mm
Insulation - Installationsebene gedämmt:
30 mm
Other - OSB:
20 mm
Insulation - Holzweichfaserplatte:
160 mm
Wood - vertikale Bretterschalung Fichte mit Nut und Feder:
20 mm


Windows

Wooden windows from the local carpenter

additional windows in the roof

Wooden windows from the local carpenter

The windows in the young family's apartment were renewed. When replacing the windows, special care was taken not to change the view of the courtyard: The decision was therefore made to use two-sash double-glazed windows, what allowed the very narrow, historical-looking frames. The windows were built by the local carpenter and replace 20 year old one-sash windows.

The historic Bifora windows from the late Renaissance in the Rittersaal on the 2nd floor were not changed. However, the room is not in constant use.

Existing window U-value Glass [W/m2K]: 2,7 New window U-value Glass[W/m2K]: 1,3 Existing window U-value Frame [W/m2K]: 2,3 New window U-value Frame [W/m2K]: 2,3
More Details
Existing window type Casement window
Existing glazing type Double
Existing shading type Outer shutter
Approximate installation year 1995
New window type Casement window
New glazing type Double
New shading type Roller blinds
New window solar factor g [-] 0,6
additional windows in the roof

Four additional windows were used to illuminate the house-in-house box on the top floor in accordance with the preservation authorities.

Apart from that, the roof remains untouched.

Existing window U-value Glass [W/m2K]: 0,0 New window U-value Glass[W/m2K]: 1,0 Existing window U-value Frame [W/m2K]: 0,0 New window U-value Frame [W/m2K]: 1,5
More Details
Existing window type no window
Existing glazing type none
Existing shading type NA
New window type Casement window
New glazing type Double
New shading type NA
New window solar factor g [-] 0,7

Other interventions

ROOF

GROUND FLOOR

OTHER

ROOF

The ceiling to the attic was mostly insulated with ~25cm insulation during the renovation - this reduced the losses from the apartment to the attic (which originally accounted for 25% of the apartment's heat losses) from ~8'500 kWh/year to ~1'500 kWh/year, i.e. to less than one fifth.

The attic itself was preserved as a cold room - except for the built-in house-in-house box for the harvest helpers

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K] 1 U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K] 0.2
More Details
Original roof build-up
Other - .:
10 mm
Other - Die bestehende Decke zum Dachboden war ohne jegliche Dämmung:
300 mm
Retrofitted roof build-up
Other - OSB:
20 mm
Other - Steinwolle:
130 mm
Other - Beton:
60 mm
Other - Holzbretter:
24 mm
Other - Dampfbremse sd>1500:
1 mm
Other - Steinwolle (zwischen Sparren):
130 mm
Other - Gipskartonplatte:
12 mm
GROUND FLOOR

The ground floor structure was changed fundamentally due to the underfloor heating that was inserted in every room, except for the cross vault and the central hall. The original terrazzo floor was imitated in the vaulted entrance. In the remaining rooms, the original wooden floorboards were sanded down to ensure that the historic doors were opened.

both aspects of monument preservation and sustainability were taken into account.

U-value (pre-intervention) [W/m2K] 0 U-value (post-intervention) [W/m2K] 0
More Details
Original groundfloor build-up
Finish - Innenputz:
15 mm
Other - bestehende Holzbretter:
25 mm
Concrete slab - bestehender Beton :
42 mm
Other - Ausgleich:
20 mm
Finish - Laminat:
20 mm
Retrofitted groundfloor build-up
Finish - Gipskartonplatte:
24 mm
Insulation - 2 Schichten 1. Steinwolle 110 kg/m³ (130mm) 2. Steinwolle 60 kg/m (60mm)³:
190 mm
Other - bestehende Holzbretter:
25 mm
Concrete slab - bestehender Beton:
60 mm
Insulation - Steinwolle 60kg/m³:
130 mm
Damp Proof Membrane - OSB:
20 mm
Floor joists - Bodenbelag:
15 mm
OTHER

The historic interior doors were removed and repaired with skilled craftsmanship.

The existing paint of the interior doors was leached and the cracks were puttyled.

HVAC

HEATING

DOMESTIC HOT WATER

HEATING

The old room stoves were replaced by a central pellet / wood stove. In the living room, the existing stove got a new look, which integrates well into the general concept.

In the apartment of the old farmers only kitchen and bathroom are heated (about 30m² of the total 140m²), the accommodation for the harvesters in the attic is used only until the end of November - but here the hypothetical heating demand for a whole winter is shown.

More Details
New primary heating system New secondary heating system
New system type Stove Stove
Fuel Wood and Pellets Stückholz
Distribuition system Radiating floor Since the wood stove is in the living room, this room is heated. The heat therefore only reaches the other rooms via the air distribution.
Nominal power NA since for the whole building, not just the refurbished flat kW In general, the nominal output of the furnace cannot be specified. It is primarily defined by the user and his own feeling of comfort. kW
DOMESTIC HOT WATER

By installing the pellet / wood stove, the hot water treatment was also renewed.

Nature conservation is guaranteed through the sustainable raw material wood from their own woods.

More Details
New DHW system
Type with heating system
Hot_water_tank Si
With heat recovery No

RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS

Biomass

Biomass

In summer, mainly pellets are used for the preparation of domestic hot water.

In winter for heating wood from their own forest.

More Details
Biomass System
Type Logs from their own forest and pellets
Storage size
Origin of biomass own woods
Overall yearly production 44000,0 kWh

Energy Efficiency

Energy Performance
Energy performance certificate: Since the building is a listed , the calculation of the energy performance was not mandatory. However, as part of the documentation, an estimate of losses and gains was made for the situation both before and after the refurbishment, which was cross-checked with the consumption figure of ~50 m³ bulk wood.
Voluntary certificates: No
Energy Use
Heating
Primary Energy 181 kWh/m2.y
Consumption_estimation_Before: 230 kWh/m2.y
Consumption_estimation_After: 135 kWh/m2.y

Primary Energy
Consumption_estimation_Calculation_method: see "energy efficiency", here DHW included
Consumption_estimation_Including_DHW: Si
Consumption_estimation_Before: 260 kWh/m2.y
Consumption_estimation_After: 181 kWh/m2.y
Measured Parameters
UserBehavior
Type_of_monitoring: Continuous
Description: The user is able to monitor the energy and regulate it if necessary.

Internal Climate

Temperature

The temperature is kept relatively constant due to the underfloor heating. However, there are different temperatures in different rooms.

Costs

Financial Aspects

There were no financial reasonings important for the renovation, decisions were made mostly based on the user needs. The total cost of the renovation was approx. 340,000 €.

Running Costs
Lifecycle cost
No

Environment

Greenhouse Gas Emissions
Methodology_used: The calculation of CO2 emissions includes heating demand and domestic hot water preparation and refers to the demand of ~29m³ wood for the young farmer apartment for which an emission factor of 0.055 kgCO2/kWh was applied according to LG 362/2013.
emissions_at_use_stage_before_intervention: 18 per m2
emissions_at_use_stage_after_intervention: 11.3 per m2
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